Skip to main content

About your Search

20121001
20121031
SHOW
Journal 20
( more )
STATION
CSPAN 43
CSPAN2 38
WHUT (Howard University Television) 34
CNN 30
CNNW 28
WETA 28
MSNBCW 26
MSNBC 25
FOXNEWS 24
KQED (PBS) 24
FBC 19
WMPT (PBS) 19
CNBC 18
KRCB (PBS) 15
KCSMMHZ 14
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 477
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 497 (some duplicates have been removed)
house? >> reporter: biden became a u.s. senator when ryan turned three. and ran for president twice. he's been on many debate stages before. >> there's nothing like standing up before 20, 30, 40, 50, 70 million people. >> reporter: but bidesen also a nonstop talker prone to putting his foot in his mouth. which ryan can exploit as he did last week. >> vice president biden just today said that the middle class over the last four years has been quote buried. we agree. >> reporter: on "face the nation" today there was no shortage of debate advice for both men. >> i think paul ryan has to address some specific questions about his budget plan. but he also has to make it clear that it's his budget plan. mitt romney's plan is the one that is going to implement in the white house. >> biden is going to have to be aggressive in this debate. that's not an easy thing to calibrate. you can go overboard here. and he's opposing a young, earnest guy that's like a boy scout. >> reporter: now a lot of democrats think that the president's performance hast week won't really change the trajectory of this rac
the invasion had been planned and financed by the u.s. even down to the training of the cuban exiles at a military base in guatemala. the united states denied any such involvement in a carefully worded at the same time -- worded statement to the united nations. >> the united states has created no aggression against cuba. >> this was fertile ground for soviet integration. u.s. aerial reconnaissance photos showed approximately 40 soviet offensive nuclear weapons being set up and manned by an estimated 22,000 soviet troops. >> in 1962 there was a missile soviet gap. the soviet union could not afford to build new ones. the solution was to put short range and medium range missiles right in our backyard. the whole world literally was watching to see what president john kennedy would do. >> had kennedy done what the joint chiefs of staff wanted to do which was to invade, that there would have immediately been a nuclear war and it would have started on so called tactical level. at that point in the fall of 1962 them -- then certainly would have spread to all right out nuclear war. >> report
with another from canada, creating a potentially devastating hybrid that could ravage parts of the u.s. northeast early next week. president obama took a break from campaigning thursday to cast an early ballot in his hometown of chicago. speaking at the polling center, obama encouraged americans to take advantage of early voting. >> for all of you who have not yet voted early, i just want everybody to see what an incredibly efficient process this was, thanks to the outstanding folks who are at this particular polling place. obviously, folks in illinois and take advantage of this. but all across the country, we are seeing a lot of early voting. it means you do not have to figure out whether you need to taint time off work, figure out how to pick up the kids, and still cast your ballot if something happens on election day, you'll have already taken care of it. and as bad weather, w you will weather,et. or in chicago, snowy. this was really convenient. >> campaigning in ohio, mitt romney predicted to supporters his election would mean an increase in workers' take-home pay. >> the presiden
they're both potentially vulnerable. also, shocking video shows workers for a u.s. security contractor in afghanistan allegedly partying up, seemingly so drunk and drugged they could hardly speak. >>> plus, a reason to take the window seat. we have the amazing story of how airline passengers spotted and help save a man who had been stranded at sea for nine days. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer and you're in "the situation room." >>> monday's third and final presidential debate will be a serious challenge for both candidates. it's focused on international policy and arena where both mitt romney lacks experience and the obama administration is under growing criticism, especially when it comes to the situation in the middle east. let's start with cnn's white house correspondent dan loathian. i assume officials in the white house campaign they know the president has questions he's going to answer. >> reporter: that's correct, wolf. and there doesn't appear to be much of a difference between the two candidates when it comes to forei
of supporting terrorism. door to door, street by street, we join grass root supporters in ohio as the u.s. presidential election campaign enters a critical week. and the miracle at medinah. europe's golfers stage one of the sport's greatest comebacks in the ryder cup. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. over the past week, peopling at the u.n. publicly weighed in the debate about what to do about the syrian conflict. today it was syria's turn to respond. president assad was unsurprisingly absent from the podium. instead, the talking was left to the country's foreign minister. walid muallem accused those spork terrorism in his country and prostriding arms to his army. he said calling president assad to step down would be serious to the affairs. he met with the secretary general to show compassion to their own people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way
and the continental corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't until the european civilization a rise and began to make use of those harbors and rivers they were obvious so help us think about why it's the geography we spoke upon based to the cultural with the supposition one aspect. >> phyllis do ha and -- that was unable to cross across a land of the voyages of the devel
just a tad. the euro is trading to $1.2966. consolations between china and the u.s. have seen better days. the u.s. has released a report saying that americans have -- should not do business with communications companies. >> the report follows an 11- month investigation into two companies. >> legislators in washington fear foreign telecom companies could pose a threat to u.s. national securit. it says firms could use their business in the u.s. to install software to is by an ounce -- spy on u.s. infrastructure. they named two companies and they believe they should be wary of huawei and zte. the two companies deny the allegations and have the support of the chinese government. >> when china in the u.s. benefit from the business we do in america are, we hope the congress will monday's their opinions on prejudice but on the facts so as not to hurt bilateral trade relations. >> this is just the latest battle in a war of words over trade and economic practices. the u.s. has accused china of unfairly subsidizing renewable energy and the auto industry in china expressing complaints to the w
as competitive in the world as it once was. you see evidence of the u.s. getting some of it back. so mexico sort of had its breakfast, lunch and dinner the past 20 years by china appearing on the scene is probably in the early stages of regaining some of that a. so i think mexico is a big winner. southeast asia, philippines, for example. >> all right. jim, stick around. more to come from you. let's get over to asia and get a wrap of the day over there. >> thanks, ross. asian markets were mostly higher buoyed by improved data in u.s. and europe and also the rba rate cut. surprising move from the central bank helped the australian market end at a five month high. resources and banks enjoyed the rally. the aussie dollar on a one month low on the back of that decision. more companies announced profit warnings as concrete signs of a fwleb al slowdown, but shipping companies rebounded on some short covering.korea, the bok a it would for growth. but the kospi ended flat. losses in hyundai motor and samsung electronics ahead of its q3 earnings guidance. the company also officially added the iphone 5 in
the world see japanese and u.s. government bonds as safer assets in the face of the prolonged credit crisis in europe. they snapped up japanese bonds, causing the yen to spike to record levels. imf economists note japan and the united states are facing huge deficits and the countries need to implement fiscal reforms to maintain investor confidence. it also acknowledges a decision by eurozone countries to launch a permanent fund designed to bail out struggling members. they say worries about the health of the region's financial system have increased since the spring with the need to use capital to help troubled banks in spain. >>> greece is one of the struggling eurozone members counting on bailout funds to keep it functioning. international lenders are demanding the country's politicians implement deep spending cuts in return for that aid. angela merkel traveled to athens to urge greek leaders to push ahead with austerity measures. merkel met with greek prime minister samas and this is her first visit since the debt crisis began three years ago. she hopes the country will stay with the euro
. there are worries about the failure of u.s. policy makers to agree so far on a fiscal plan. >> reporter: he ran through a list of challenges in developed countries. government spending cuts, a weak financial system, high unemployment. emerging economies such as china drove the recovery from the global downturn, but they have cooled off. >> clearly the downside if the global economy were to slow much more than expected, then additional policy measures will be needed. >> reporter: he said he was encouraged by the easy money policies of many banks and pieces to what he called a complex puzzle are starting to fall into place. he said if the puzzle can be completed, then one can hope that the worst might be behind us. ron madison, nhk world, tokyo. >>> this high level gathering wouldn't have been happening here in tokyo if things had gone according to plan. accordi organizers originally decided to go in egypt. immediately raised his hand and proposed japan would host. we spoke with the vice minister of finance for international finance. >> reporter: vice minister nakoa was instrumental to bringing t
to the former u.s. ambassador to pakistan. thank you for joining us. he was saying in his report this could prove a turning point with pakistan. what do you think? >> i think there are millions of people across pakistan that certainly hope so. i was very encouraged to die. of course, it is the day of prayer for malala. the chief of the mosque in lahore calls for "and ambassador of hope." that is an enormously significant. religious scholars have issued a fatwah, determining that the attack was unislamic. these are important messages that we hope will unify pakistan and they seem to be. >> how much support do you think there is at the grass-roots level for the taliban policy of not letting girls of education? >> is basically a conservative society. you would find most people are conservative about girls' education. they supported for the first -- for the first few years. they do support -- is long does it support girls' education. -- islam does support girls' education. the fact that malala is one of them, it has personalized the issue. >> do you think this attack on malala might help the pa
. after the u.s.-led invasion of iraq, which was serious and opposed in syria was turning a blind life is not helping jihad discussed the area into iraq to kill u.s. soldiers and allied soldiers. there's a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to say they were next on the hit list, so they were doing everything they could to help make this happen. there's one high-level syrian official told me later on, of course we were helping them across. you know what? we wanted you guys to kill them. that's why we wanted to go because we wanted these guys to kill you guys. we don't want them in our country. unfortunately they killed a lot of our boys. when he survived and particularly after the assassination of former lebanese rafik hariri, that was blamed on syria by most of the international community and the pressure just escalated exponentially after that against syria and people in late 2005 were counting the days for the assad regime. the expatriates, organization just waiting to move in one assad fell. but that created in hand and triumphalism and survivalism that very muc
as 2006, and the reason is this. in -- after the u.s. invasion of iraq which syria posed, and syria was turning a blind eye cannot help but the hottest, there is a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to say that that there are next on the hit list so there would do anything they could to help make this happen. one high-level official told me the wrong, of course were helping. you know why? we wanted you guys to kill them. we don't want them in our country. when you survive that, particularly after the assassination, that was blamed on syria but most of the national community. the pressure just escalated exponentially after that. people work in late 2005 counting the days for the gasol regime. syrian expatriates, organizations that were just waiting to move in. but he survived that. in that thing that really created in him a sense of triumph and some and survivalism that very much informed his view of the world and response to the uprising in march 2011 because it instill then him the sense of destiny, righteousness, that he survived the best shot the west could t
, the u.s. district court ruled the state had failed to provide a convincing argument and must extend early weekend voting to all, not just members of the military. democrats have accused republicans of seeking to block early voting in a bid to disenfranchise those likely to cast their ballots for president obama. asking the supreme court to intervene, the ohio secretary of state called the ruling in an unprecedented intrusion. the supreme court has rejected a challenge to a 2008 law granting immunity to telecom companies that aided the bush administration's warrantless domestic spy program. groups including the electronic frontier foundation and the american civil liberties union had brought the case, consolidating 33 different lawsuits against the company's after a lower court ruled that the firms are protected by congressionally mandated retroactive immunity. in appeals court upheld the case's dismissal last year. on tuesday, the supreme court declined to hear it without comment. the ruling could mark the end of legal attempts to hold the telecom firms accountable for the spying. i
frequently find numerous media outlets and has written for quite a few of the major u.s. newspapers in the area or in these areas of his expertise. he is extremely knowledgeable man as seen things happen and comments on them in my humble opinion in a reasonable and accurate way. he will be followed by doc or robert freedman who is the meyer hall pearl pearl storm professor of political science at baltimore hebrew university and a visiting professor of political science at johns hopkins university. he has been a consultant to the u.s. department of state and central intelligence agency and he is the author of four books, soviet foreign-policy and also the editor and has been the editor of 14 books on israel and middle eastern policy. and then our third speaker will be dr. stephen blank the strategic study institutes expert on soviet lock and post-soviet world since 1989. he is the editor of imperial decline in russia's changing position in asia and coeditor of the soviet military in the future, and the last speaker is dr. ariel cohen my colleague at heritage who is the senior fellow
people to unite. the economic penalties by the eu and the u.s. have caused the value of the currency, the riyal, to plummet. thousands of people took to the streets of tehran two weeks ago in protest. a spokesperson from iran's petroleum ministry said earlier this month a natural gas embargo would have no effect as the country doesn't export it to the eu. iran has the second largest natural gas reserves in the world. officials say they plan to expand exports to turkey and other neighboring countries. but these latest sanctions could affect those plans. >>> eu foreign ministers agreed to tighten sanctions against syria, too. they've been trying to pressure president bashar al assad to stop a crackdown on his own people. the ministers shared their concerns about the spread of the conflict into turkey and other neighboring countries. they agreed to impose sanctions on more individuals and companies. >> we've added 28 people to the list of those subject to a travel ban and an asset freeze. two additional entities were targeted with an asset freeze. >> 54 entities and 181 people are now s
between the u.s., russia and syria. a pal discuss the syrian support of the -- a panel discusses russian support of the syrian civil war. this is about an hour and a half. >> we welcome all of you joining us on heritage foundation and on c-span. we ask that you turn off yourself funds as we begin recording for the benefit of today's program. the we will post for everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is dr. steven bucci. his focus is special operations and cyber security. he commanded the third battalion fifth special forces and also became the military assistant to donald rumsfeld. at his retirement, -- prior to joining us, he was a leading consultant on cyber security. please welcome the in -- join me in welcoming steven bucci. [applause] >> we have a very timely subjects to discuss, and i think we have a great panel of experts that will be doing be discussing to get us started. i have been interested in this because one of the first things i did was testified before congress about the weapons of mass destruction threat that syria and the somewhat untimely demise mig
and the reason is this. after the u.s.-led invasion of iraq which syria opposed, and syria was turning a blind eye to cross into iraq to kill u.s. soldiers and allied soldiers. there was a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to fail and they thought they were next on the hit list so they would do anything they could to help make this happen. one high-level syrian official told me later on, he said of course they were helping iraq. we wanted our guys to kill them. that is why we went into iraq. we wanted to get them out and get them through and you guys would kill them. and when he survived, particularly after the assassination of former lebanese prime minister in february 2005 that was blamed on syria by most of the international community and the pressure just escalated exponentially after that against syria. people in late 2005 for counting the days when the assad regime, there were syrian expatriates and organizations that were just waiting to move in. but he survived that and i think that really created in him a sense of triumphalist and survivalism that very much infor
and general jim jones. >> i quite agree that my judgment is that much of the world wants u.s. leadership, they don't feel comfortable without it, but they no longer react to any dictatorial or any due toarls from us. they want to participate but they also want to be listened to. >> i am not even sure where the word leader hip is a good word to describe the role america should play in the world. we should be playing the stabilizing role. we should be organizing our coalitions, we should be a source of stability, but when we talk about leadership, too many people think of the iraq and 2003, which was a fatally bad exercise of leadership. >> rose: we conclude this evening with dexter filkins of the new yorker magazine who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he said a lot of soldiers and marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the onl
a treaty of friendship and cooperation. by 1974, as egypt began to move into the u.s. orbit, syria emerged as the no. 1 ally. not to say there are no problems between the two sides. the syrian intervention in lebanon clearly displeased moscow as did its agreement to security council to hundred 42. it's one of the few states that supported the soviet invasion of afghanistan in 1979 and was richly rewarded with military aid as a result. that continued until the advent of gorbachev in 1985 to turn off the tap of military aid. the chill in the relationship continued until 2005 when a combination of increasing syrian isolation due to policies in lebanon and a much more aggressive russian foreign policy under vladimir putin established a close russian- syrian relationship we see today. let's look at the policies of vladimir putin in his second term. i see is reacting to be setbacks like the school fiasco, the orange revolution in the ukraine, and the increasing vulnerability of the u.s. in the middle east because of the invasion of iraq which -- and because of the revival in the taliban in afgha
. public sector purchasing has been suffering and huawei didn't have a lot of share in the u.s. to begin with. but companies that do business with the government might back away from considering huawei. they're the number two telecom maker in the world so this might help cisco gain some share in other markets where governments could be influenced by the u.s. move. could also help erickson, the number one telecom commitment supplier. juniper has set up demo labs to try to push the brand. the key is what happens in europe. u.s. is just 4% of huawei's business. europe is more like 14%. that's where u.s. companies will look to gain an advantage. >> jon, china is also key to another tech company in the news today, apple. the company that assembles iphones is denying reports of strikes over the weekend. what's going on with this. >> well, it's interesting. when this first china labor watch report came out saying that there had had been these strikes, i was a little bit skeptical because that organization has pushed awfully hard against apple. its tone has been a bit harsh about apple's labor r
the u.s. state department said it considered -- for more. >> the u.s. state department said it considered turkey's response to be proportionate. thursday morning, turkey launched a second round of shelling. some reports say several syrian soldiers were killed. >> the retaliation came after five turkish civilians were killed after syrian mortar fire. turkey says that syria has now apologized for that incident and has promised it would not happen again. >> it is a small turkish town bordering war-torn syria. it has come under the line of fire. syrian borders struck a residential neighborhood, killing five civilians -- syrian mortars struck a residential neighborhood, killing five civilians. cross-border buyer has struck 37 times since the start of the syrian uprising -- cross-border fire has struck turkey several times since the start of the syrian uprising. the government says this bill is not a declaration of war against syria. >> turkey is not a country that wants war. it is a country that wants peace, but we're also a part of a country that is visible -- capable of doing w
from u.s. ratings agency moody's, which expects hard times for german banks and warns they are not as crisis-resistant as institutes in other countries. it put pressure on the dax, but the german dax was also under pressure after a very successful week due to very disappointing results from the u.s. >> let's get a closer number at that -- a closer look at those numbers. it was a down day for the tax, ending its winning streak because of concerns about europe's banks. it was a similar story for the year of stocks -- the euro stoxx 50. trading is still under way for the dow jones industrial average, and it is being dragged lower by disappointing corporate earnings. the euro is trading for $1.3021. and suddenly, today is the 25th anniversary of the stock market crash of 1987, known as black monday. the dow plunged more than 20% on that date. >> that's right. in europe, leaders are hoping the eu's banking deal will help shore markets and reduce the possibility of an event like that happening again. >> but the sad reality on the ground is that ordinary citizens continue to
. but we are seeing, economies of europe and the u.s. starting to really stagnate. we are seeing a slowdown in china. and india. wondering how much can asia continue to support growth? >> as we see,isha^ kra asia re leader. we expect asia to grow 5.5% this year, rising to 6 poe% this yea above global growth. i would say, you will see demand pick up in asia and keep growing -- growth active and robust. >> speaking of domestic demand, how much will that be able to really shield asian countries, do you think from the global slowdown we are seeing. what do policy makers need to do to ensure that domestic demand continues? >> this is a very important issue. they're dealing with this, two ways to handle this. there is ram oom to build new stimulus on the fiscal side. for many countries, inflation is back in the comfort zone. and for national conditions a. accomodated. looking ahead -- asia is looking to rebalance. and raise domestic demand in different ways. between china and other countries in asia. >> so far there really hasn't been a whole lot of focus on fiscal consolidationof asian countrie
. a thousand page report from the u.s. anti-doping agency on how the seven times tour de france winner got away with it. >> it paints an undeniable web of, unfortunately, the deepest and the most sophisticated professionalized drug program we've ever seen a team run. >> hello, with the world of news and opinion. also in the program, the airport drama that escalates tensions between turkey and syria. and from moscow and damascus flight that had illegal cargo. the young pakistani girl shot by the taliban because she campaigned for education. still critical and now moved to another hospital. it's midday here in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington where the sporting icon lance armstrong's reputation has suffered yet another blow at the american anti-doping agency labeled him a serial cheat. they have accused him of being at the heart of the most sophisticated doping program ever seen in the sport. it says armstrong used illegal blood and drug transfusions and led his teammates to do the same. >> the american anti-doping agency says it is beyond doubt. lance armstrong won the tour de france seven times
leaders are seeing against their sanctions against iran are working. u.s. and european officials organize an oil embargo to encourage the them to abandon their ambitions. >> reporter: it dropped below 35,000 against the dollar for the first time since islamic revolution of 1979. the currency has fallen nearly 20% against the dollar in one week. it's 70% down year on year. exchange markets in tehran has been busy selling dollars or euros. people are complaining of high unemployment and expressing worries about the future. >> translator: this is a disaster. as the dollar goes up it brings inflation and makes our daily essentials more expresencive. >> translator: i lost my job with the food company and i'm jobless now. >> reporter: iranian president has faced questions in parliament over his inability to hold the currency's decline. the european union is considering further sanctions against iran this month. the iranian government has yet to take effective action to stop the further decline of its currency. >>> japanese and south korean politicians have been sparring over territory they both
of is romney presidential in a way that he could lead the u.s. on the world stage? we've seen an ad and a memo out today from the obama campaign trying to paint him as belacose, as not ready, and we expect president obama is going to be doing that tonight here in florida. >> one of the other big issues likely to come up tonight is iran. over the weekend i see your "times" article saying the u.s. and tehran had agreed to one-on-one talks about iran's nuclear program after the election. u.s. will deny that. a lot of people might say what's wrong -- regardless, can the president make the case that his strategy on iran is working or does this give mitt romney an opening? >> you know, the answer may be yes to both of those. obviously president obama would make his case that these are the toughest sanctions ever, and that they have been working. you just look at iran's economy. you look at the value of iran's currency, which has plummeted, and he can say the sanctions are working, but, obviously, governor romney can say they're not really shifting iran to changing its behavior. even if everyone expe
does anything that the u.s. government says, although we still say it. .. i remember when secretary clinton went on her first trip to china she had a forum with 16 women from different areas in china. was blogged, it was streamed, people would challenge the hiv/aids policy, incredibly brave women and secateurs clinton provided a forum for them to speak to a larger audience. these were the kind of things i think we can do. >> a question from right here in the room in the audience. president obama and governor rahm yo both said they want america to have a positive relationship with china but they must play by the rules. how well they pushed china if they think china is not playing by the rules, house specifically, dr. bader? >> how specifically will they -- >> push china if they are not playing by the rules? >> my last act in government, my last time around was second place in negotiations with a succession of the world trade organization. the world trade organization lays out in detail global rules. it was a 17 year negotiation for china, and it made extensive commitments. china used
the chairman of the house of endangering several libyans who have been working with the u.s. by not giving their names when he released 166 pages unclassified libya documents. heading tomorrow night's foreign policy debate are, i have to say, more confusing to me as a consumer of news than they have ever been. we talked about this early on. i will put myself in the category of people who were troubled. category of people who were troubled by what seemed to be a distance between what the reporting and what the intelligence agency seemed to be saying and what was coming out of the white house. i thought that gab was worrisome. we talked about it on the show. i don't know what to think anymore because what looked like it first was officially the u.s. government line was this was spontaneous and in reaction to the video. there was a parallel channel of reporting indicating it was premeditated, the work of al qaeda militants and had nothing to do with the video. there was no protest in the video. that is what happened. now we have reporting from the l.a. times and "the new york times" talking t
. >>> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. at approximately 6:15 a.m. eastern time, former u.s. senator george mcgovern passed away while in hospice in sioux falls, south dakota. he was 90 years old. an early opponent of the vietnam war he was, the nominee for president in 1972 for democrats. he lost in a landslide election to republican richard nixon. in a statement, the mcgovern family said "we are blessed to know that our father lived a long, successful and productive life. advocating for the hungry, fighting for peace." mcgovern long will be remembered for his unwavering opposition to war and war is where we begin this morning. today we're taking you back to june 28th, 1914. yes. june 28, 1914. that was the day that a foreign emissary was assassinated while on a diplomatic mission in sarajevo. that set off a chain of events that led to the largest global conflict the world had ever seen. on that fateful day, a 19-year-old took the life of arch duke franz ferdinand. knowing the dead to the austrian hungarian empire would not go unanswered, serbia appealed to their russian neighbors f
about putting money back in the states, we'll tell you where to go outside of the u.s. liz: plus an earnings season crystal ball. the competitive edge with two big names that could be setting up for a big beat, and then two names that could fall flat. david: all right. we're going to tell you what drove the markets with today's data download. stocks sliding as hints of a weak earnings season weigh on the market. all three major indices closing the trading day in the red. eight of the ten s&p sectors ended negative, and telecom and technology leading the decline. energy and utilities were today's top performers. the euro falling from are a two week high against the dollar and yen today as uncertainty over spain's need for a bailout continues. the euro dropped a half a percent to $1.29 after hitting a high of $1.31 against the greenback last week. well, oil falling for the second straight day, settling down 55 cents at $89.33 a barrel. concerns of slower economic growth in china and europe's debt crisis will curb demand for oil, sent the prices a little lower. lid liz let's take it
is consumption in the u.s., is not where it was. what's replaced that is government stimuli around the world that has been effective in the main. the first chinese one was very effective. the situation in china right now, i would say, in the industrial b to b world, they're at, in my view, somewhere in the 2% range of growth. not 6%, not 7%. that's an industrial engine. thousands and thousands of small mediums are having trouble. our supply chains are weak. and, of course, the slow motion train wreck that is europe and if i could be optimistic there, let's say they're on the rails again. they just need people to drive the train. maybe i can finish my run around the world with the one optimistic place that we should be thinking very positive about, which is the united states. we have a strong hand right now. our political process is not allowing us to play it. capital is a coward. businesses hate uncertainty. we have uncertainty even in this country on things that matter. not the least of which being our phenomenal energy position, which i can talk about more, if you wish. maybe the u.s. can
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 497 (some duplicates have been removed)